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Could A Diet Full of Fruit And Veg Cut Breast Cancer Risks?

A diet rich in fruit and vegetables could be the answer to reducing the risk of developing breast cancer, particularly aggressive tumours, new research has shown.

Scientists at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health have discovered that the quantity and type of fruit and vegetables consumed has an association with breast cancer risk.

First author of the study Maryam Farvid, who is a research scientist in the Department of Nutrition, said: “Although prior studies have suggested an association, they have been limited in power, particularly for specific fruits and vegetables and aggressive subtypes of breast cancer.”

She added this latest report provides the most “complete picture” in finding out how to prevent breast cancer through a healthy diet.

The research, which was published in the International Journal of Cancer earlier this month, showed women who consumed 5.5 servings of fruit and vegetables or more a day lowered their breast cancer risk by 11 per cent compared with those who ate 2.5 servings or fewer.

Previous work concluded that a healthy diet has many far-reaching benefits. However, this report showed positive results irrespective of how fibrous the fruit and vegetables were, indicating that their antioxidants and other nutrients also have an impact on cutting breast cancer risk.

It also revealed cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, and orange and yellow vegetables, were more effective at reducing the chance of developing the disease.

Leading a healthier lifestyle in general can have huge benefits, with The Telegraph reporting a study that showed losing weight can significantly reduce breast cancer risks for postmenopausal women.

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